Admiralty House, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Ref: 067)

Admiralty House, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Ref: 067)

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ORIGINAL Pen & Ink. 8 X 11.      Framed  16 x 19 

$445.

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Signed & Matted Limited Edition Print 8" x 10" 

$12  each. (plus shipping $4.) 

Admiralty House, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Ref: 067)

Admiralty House was build between 1814-1819 and ranks as one of the finest Georgian mansions of Canada.  Too fine, perhaps, from the perspective of the Lords of Admiralty, who through the 18th century preferred that the admirals in command of the North American Station live a life of readiness aboard their flagship or in rough quarters of the Halifax Dockyards.  However, with the Napoleonic Wars behind them a succession of admirals pressed for accommodations more appropriate to their rank in the very rank-conscious garrison town.  The stingy Lords of Admiralty back in London notwithstanding, a fine mansion was raised bits at a time out of budgetary finagling and local civilian largess (the Provincial Legislature was apparently also embarrassed by the circumstances of the beached admirals).  It is not known whether all the marble and mahogany finery diminished naval readiness, but  history records many fine social turns and twirls on the special cushioned dance floor that graced Admiralty House.  However, as the story goes, the resident admiral of the 1850s was want too keep pigs on the grounds and came to conflict with the neighbors, whereupon he move the Command to Bermuda.  Since then Admiralty House has seen service as a hospital, officers mess, and now as a fine Naval Museum.