Acadia University Series

University HallAcadia War Memorial GymSeminary House, Acadia, Wolfville, NSEmerson Hall Acadia Univ (Ref: 048)Manning Chapel, Acadia, Wolville, NSMemorial Gymnasium, Acadia, Wolfville, NSAlumni House, Wolfville, NSEmerson Hall, Acadia University (Ref: 002)
Seminary House, Acadia, Wolfville, NS

Seminary House, Acadia, Wolfville, NS

Scroll down for historical sketch 

Signed & Matted Limited Edition Print 8" x 10" 

$15  each. (plus shipping $4.) 

Set of all 6 Prints. $70 (plus shipping $8)

Add the appropriate shipping charge and submit your order by email(gallery@eastlink.ca), giving us the destination postal address and your telephone number.  We will respond promptly and notify you when your payment has been received and the tracking # for your parcel.

The Armstrong Gallery accepts payment for online orders by:
1. email-transfer of funds to 
gale@eastlink.ca (available within Canada)
2. Visa or Mastercard.  Please email or telephone  (902-640-2176) with the credit card particulars.

If ordering more than one piece of artwork we will do our best to combine the packaging to obtain the best shipping rate and will advise you accordingly as to the final charge.
 

YOUR PATRONAGE IS MUCH APPRECIATED…THANK YOU!

SEMINARY HOUSE

Seminary House has been the focal point of collegiate life for the women of Acadia University for over a century since the first woman graduated in 1884.  The Ladies Seminary (formerly the “Female Department of Horton Academy”) was absorbed into Acadia College in 1877.  That winter College Hall burned down and the powers that be set about a dynamic rebuilding program that happily included fashionable quarters for the fairer sex on campus.  How proud was Acadia of its new co-educational status?  Proud enough to pony-up $13,000 for Seminary House, rivaling the budget for the new Collage Hall; and then in 1890 another $30,000 was allocated for the East Wing expansion of Seminary House.  The handsome Victorian building was designed by F. P. Dumaresq to incorporate classrooms, a dining hall, assembly quarters and a small gymnasium.  That same year Seminary House was electrified, which was not a bad idea for a massive wooden structure on a campus that seemed to have a habit of going ablaze.